no third solution

Blogging about liberty, anarchy, economics and politics

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  • Jeff Molby says on: July 31, 2008 at 1:56 am

     

    I’m no fan of the Fed, but I couldn’t find a source for the estimates used in the chart. It’s pretty, but meaningless without a list of the assumptions used.

  • Francois Tremblay says on: July 31, 2008 at 11:13 am

     

    Yea, this graph goes up to 2024, this is just not credible.

  • matt says on: July 31, 2008 at 3:32 pm

     

    I don’t see the red line extending to the year 2024.

    The data is from here: http://www.minneapolisfed.org/Research/data/us/calc/hist1800.cfm

    The graph is from here:
    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:USACPI1800.svg

  • David Z says on: July 31, 2008 at 5:58 pm

     

    I think Franc was J/K. I checked against a calculator available through EH.net and the results looked even worse, about 800, instead of 621.

  • Francois Tremblay says on: August 1, 2008 at 1:20 pm

     

    I wasn’t joking. Why does the graph extend to 2024?

  • David Z says on: August 1, 2008 at 2:32 pm

     

    Does it really matter that the scale on the X-axis goes to 2024? The data go to 2008…

  • Robert Evans says on: August 2, 2008 at 2:02 pm

     

    In general, statistics demonstrating that there has been inflation do not convince anyone that anything is wrong, because public opinion normally holds that a low but constantly positive level of inflation is good for promoting growth. That’s the belief that needs to be changed. Otherwise, you’re just preaching to the choir.

  • Francois Tremblay says on: August 26, 2008 at 1:12 pm

     

    If it extends to imaginary dates like 2024, then it’s not credible. Period.

no third solution

Blogging about liberty, anarchy, economics and politics