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Ending the Drug War: Going Mainstream?

May 22nd, 2009

There has been a lot of mainstream political talk about drug decriminalization/legalization lately. Tom Tancredo risked whatever’s left of his political career by openly and seriously endorsing the legalization of drugs using the following anecdote to underscore his argument:

“It is now easier for a kid to get drugs at most schools in America than it is booze,” he said.

I think it just shows how little politicians know, how out of touch with reality that they actually are. He says “now” like there’s been a sea-change that’s just recently been brough to everyone’s attention—that up until “now” it was difficult for kids to get teh drug. My guess is that ever since they raised the drinking age from 18 to 21 in the mid 1970s (and also prior to lowering the drinking age to 18), that it’s been easier for a kid to get drugs at most schools in America than it is for a kid to get booze. Much easier.

Even the White House “drug czar”, Gil Kerlikowske, has called for an “openness to rethinking the government’s approach to fighting drug use.” In fact, he wants to end to the war on drugs.

Regardless of how you try to explain to people it’s a ‘war on drugs’ or a ‘war on a product,’ people see a war as a war on them,” he said. “We’re not at war with people in this country.

Good for you!  People don’t deserve to be shot for doing drugs.  They don’t deserve to have their lives destroyed by your goons, so if you’re not at war with people in this country, then stop acting like it! The fact of the matter is that the primary focus of a good portion of America’s law enforcement industry is dedicated to waging war on American citizens, in the name of a plant. James Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police puts the institutional incentives in perspective:

“While I don’t necessarily disagree with [Kerlikowske’s] focus on treatment and demand reduction, I don’t want to see it at the expense of law enforcement. People need to understand that when they violate the law there are consequences.”

Yes, yes… “Rule of law” scam and all. Translation: I don’t want to end the war on drugs if it means we don’t get to play Cowboys-and-Indians anymore. I don’t want to end the war on drugs if it means that police officers will lose their jobs. Talk about withholding the cure to profit from the sickness—the zenith of moral bankruptcy. So, as long as people like Pasco are in any position of influence or authority, expect your protectors to continue waging the war.

Although it’s encouraging to hear more and more talk about decriminalization and legalization in the mainstream news outlets and from the major political parties, until I see it happen, I’m not holding my breath.

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  • Cork says on: May 25, 2009 at 12:57 am

     

    This really shocked me when I first heard about it. Of all the people I might have expected to come out for drug legalization, Tancredo wasn't exactly at the top of the list.

    • nothirdsolution says on: May 25, 2009 at 2:34 pm

       

      I have a hard time accepting this sort of "coming out" as anything but disingenuous pandering. In politics, desperate men do desperate things, always reserving the ability to throw us back under the bus whenever it's no longer politically expedient to support our beliefs.

no third solution

Blogging about liberty, anarchy, economics and politics